BYWAY FAQ

FAQ — a quick guide to the scenic byway process, proposed projects and terms used

WHAT DOES THE SCENIC BYWAY DESIGNATION MEAN?
Scenic Byway is a road and area designated by the State of Hawai’i as having unique characteristics and significant sites that require a community plan to ensure their preservation and protection.  There are a total of 4 scenic byways on Hawai’i Island and 4 more in the State.

WHAT IS THE STATE’S ROLE?
The State provided a framework for developing the community plan which is called a Corridor Management Plan (CMP).  There is no federal role. While all scenic byways follow the same framework, objectives and projects are designed to meet the unique needs of each community.

WHAT IS THE RED ROAD SCENIC BYWAY’S MISSION?
To advocate for community concerns, protect and preserve intrinsic qualities, plan for the future, research and celebrate our history, and work for improved quality of life and safety.

WHAT ABOUT TOURISM?
Like our sister byway, Ka’ū’s Slopes of Mauna Loa, the Red Road Scenic Byway seeks to enhance and educate the tourist experience.  Our projects call for interpretive activities to promote environmental and cultural understanding and sensitivity, safety information, and means to encourage tourist stops at designated spots (as opposed to stopping in the middle of the road for pictures)

IS THERE A LIST OF ALL OBJECTIVES AND PROJECTS?
Click Implementation Table for the first draft. Projects will be added, refined, prioritized based on survey results.

WHY THE NAME “RED ROAD”?
Scenic byway names are generally THEME names not road place names.  In Kona, Ali’i Drive is named “Royal Footsteps.” On the mainland there is the Frontier Pathways, Trail of the Ancients, Underground Railroad, Journey through Hallowed Ground, etc.  We found no traditional THEME name for the area but “Red Road” has been used for decades (and still is) to describe not only the road but the area.  The red color of the road may be gone, but the theme of the many volcanic flows is part of our history and our plan contains both ancient stories of Pele and more recent experiences.
Ke Kai Kua ‘au lehua a Puna ‘ewa, calls to mind the image of the shallows of the sea where fallen lehua flowers redden the surface while the blossoms of the ohia are a symbol of the adaption and regeneration of nature and the resilience of people.

HOW DID THE SCENIC BYWAY HAPPEN?
The Puna Community Development Plan called for seeking byway designation for the Red Road.  Kapono, a community organization conducted a 2012 survey demonstrating community support for the idea and prepared the application to the State.  Initially, Kalani Honu provided its 501c3 status and acted as the beginning sponsor while Kapono applied for 501c3 status (granted May 2013).  Kapono has since taken over sponsorship of the byway project.

Kapono partnered with Kua O Ka Lā school, Kalani, and E Mau Na Ala Hele trail organization in applying for (and receiving) a Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance (RTCA) grant to provide assistance in creating the plan and finding resources

WHAT IS THE SCENIC BYWAY PROCESS?
The scenic byway committee process has two phases.  The first, ending this year, is charged with putting together the Corridor Management Plan (CMP) and its submittal to the State.  The second phase will take on overseeing completion of projects, carrying out yearly assessments and, with community input, revising the CMP.

WHO IS ON THE COMMITTEE AND CAN I SERVE?
Current membership: Organizational Representatives: Kua O Ka Lā school: Leila Kealoha; Hui Aloha ‘O Puna Makai: Launa Jones; Kapono: Farris Etterlee; E Mau Na Ala Hele: Toni Thomson.  Long-time Hawaiian family representative: Dottie Kyser.  Residents on the Red Road: Cheryl Morgan,  EJ Paterson.  Commerce/Traffic: Mark Hinshaw, Mainstreet Pahoa, Puna Traffic safety Committee.  Business owner: Barrie Saccomano.  Author Cultural history: Maile Carr.  Planning Department : Hans Santiago

If you would like more information about the being a member of the committee contact Cheryl Morgan, cmorgan808@hotmail.com; 808-936-4764

GLOSSARY

Ahupua’a – a major land division usually extending from the uplands to the sea, so called because the boundary was marked by a heap (ahu) of stones surmounted by the image of a pig (pua’a) or because a pig or some other tribute was laid on top as a tax to the chief. .  “… the traditional ahupua’a system was place-based, with rules and customs tied to individual watersheds, shorelines, reefs, winds and human needs.  With the power of management embedded in the local populace, economies of scale were achieved and sustainability more likely to be attained.” [Living on the Shores of Hawaii: Natural Hazards The Environment and Our Communities]

Corridor Management Plan (CMP) – the long-term community plan; a living document, yearly assessments and community input will determine changes

Pono/Kuleana project – since the scenic byway does not have the power to make or enforce regulation, it must rely on the power of community consensus.  This project will gather community consensus on what the community feels is pono (right) and what our responsibilities are (kuleana)

Preservation – the act or process of applying measures to sustain the existing form, integrity and material of a historic structure, landscape or object… generally focuses upon the ongoing preservation, maintenance and repair of historic materials and features rather than extensive replacement and new work.  Compared to restoration, preservation involves the least change  and is the most respectful of historic materials.  It maintains the form and material of the existing landscape.

Protection and Preservation – to “protect” means to keep from harm.  Preservation is a stronger form of protection which calls for something to “remain intact”

Stewardship project – seeks to monitor the health of the environment and encourage the responsible use of natural resources in a way that takes full and balanced account of the interests of society, future generations as well as private needs. It seeks to share with the community and visitors the rich history of the area and its residents.

Sustainability:  the creation of defined interrelated environmental, economic and social behaviors that can be continued indefinitely